Monthly Archives: May 2012

How to name things in your application

Humans use language to think and communicate, and when we think and speak about things and concepts in the world, we use names or labels to refer to those things. In other words, names are linguistic handles that refer to … Continue reading

Posted in Information Architecture, Psychology for UX Design, Usability, User Experience Design, Visual Design | Leave a comment

Choosing an interaction style for your application

One of the first things to be decided in creating your application’s interaction concept is to decide on the general¬†interaction style, by which we mean the fundamental way that the application presents itself to the user and allows functionality to … Continue reading

Posted in Information Architecture, Product Management, Psychology for UX Design, Usability, User Experience Design, Visual Design | Leave a comment

Don’t make assumptions about your users’ existing skills!

As a software designers, it’s easy for us to fall into the trap of assuming that users think and act the same ways we do. As a white-collar software professional, you likely have a college education and perhaps an advanced … Continue reading

Posted in Product Management, Psychology for UX Design, Requirements Engineering, Usability, User-Centered Design | 1 Comment

What is involved in designing user interfaces for an application?

Designing a user interface is, you’d might think, just a matter deciding what buttons and controls are on the screen and what happens when you press them. That’s not incorrect, but there’s usually a little bit more to it than … Continue reading

Posted in Product Management, Project Management, User Experience Design | Leave a comment

What is gamification?

Can software products be designed to motivate users and increase productivity? If you’re running an organization and your staff gets their work done using an enterprise application, you’ll naturally want to increase their productivity. Or, if you’re running a community-driven … Continue reading

Posted in Office Politics, Psychology for UX Design, Usability, User Experience Design, User-Centered Design | Leave a comment